High & Mighty Brownie Cookies

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Ever thought to put veggies and beans into brownie mix and then turn them into cookies? Wait, that’s not what you think about as you lie in bed at night? Oh. Well, I’ve taken on the age-old question and attempted an answer: How do we make brownies a complete meal? Announcing the High & Mighty Brownie Cookie. High in nutrients, mighty in taste and energy. And while I still serve them for dessert, they can certainly pass for a side dish or maybe even a main squeeze…

High & Mighty Brownie Cookies
Makes 48

1 (15-ounce) can black beans, drained & rinsed (about 1 1/2 cups cooked beans)
Large handful kale, about 2 cups chopped
1/2 cup pumpkin puree (the canned type)
1 box brownie mix
1/2 cup coconut flour, almond meal, or cashew meal

Preheat oven to 425 degrees.

Blend or food process beans, kale, and pumpkin into a smooth, olive green glop (probably not wise to taste-test this…).

Stir glop together with brownie mix and coconut flour (or almond or cashew meal).

With slightly wet hands, form into 1 1/2-inch round balls (slightly smaller than golf balls) and drop onto an ungreased cookie sheet about an inch apart.

Press down gently with a fork in a criss-cross fashion.

Bake for 10-12 minutes. Cool for 5 minutes and chow down!

Nutrition Information Per Cookie: 74 calories, 1 g fat, 36 mg sodium, 0 mg cholesterol, 11 g carbohydrate, 2 g fiber, 6 g sugar, 1 g protein, 21% vitamin A, 3% iron.

Now you (or at least I) can rest soundly. Cheers to chocolate! xo

Skin Glow from Fruits and Veggies Better Than a Sun Tan

Arugula Salad in SKINNY DISH

Arugula Salad in SKINNY DISH

Ever noticed that people who eat lots of fruits and veggies have a magical glow? Wait, you haven’t? It’s the kind where you want to run right up to them and ask if they just ate a salad. Yes, that’s the one I’m talking about. Well, here’s some new science to prove the phenomenon. A study published in The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology showed that people who ate more carotenoid-rich fruits and veggies (basically all of them, but especially the orange, red, yellow, and dark green ones), had more attractive skin tone. So, not only are these colorful crops good for your insides, but for your outsides, and for your friends’ eyes as well. Great excuse then to chow this simple and fall-friendly arugula salad. Cheers, attractive people!

Arugula Salad with Pan-Seared Butternut Squash

Makes 2 servings
Prep and cooking time: 15 minutes

Searing is a great way to bring out the flavors in veggies, and it’s done by cooking them in a skillet with high heat and very little oil, a good way to keep the fat content down. Enjoy this colorful salad in the fall when squash is aplenty.

1 tsp olive oil
2 cups very small butternut squash cubes (about the top portion of a butternut squash, peeled and finely cubed)
¼ tsp salt
¼ tsp garlic powder
1 (7-oz) bag TJ’s Wild Arugula Wild Rocket Salad, or other bag of prewashed arugula
2 Tbsp white balsamic vinegar, divided
Dash of sesame seeds for garnish (optional)

1. In a medium-sized skillet, heat oil. Add butternut squash chunks, salt, and garlic powder. Pan-sear the squash for 6 minutes stirring it every minute or so and removing it from the heat for 10 seconds at a time if the pan gets too smoky. Remove from heat and place on a plate in the fridge for 5 minutes to cool.

2. Divide bag of arugula onto 2 plates. Top each plate with the butternut squash cubes and 1 Tbsp of white balsamic vinegar. Garnish each one with sesame seeds if desired.

3. Dressed salad will not last past the current meal, so eat up! Butternut squash cubes make perfect finger foods for toddlers or toothpick veggie kebabs for young children.

NUTRITION SNAPSHOT
Per serving: 143 calories, 3 g total fat, 0.5 g saturated fat, 0 mg cholesterol, 325 mg sodium, 30 g carbohydrates, 7 g fiber, 6 g sugar, 4 g protein, 327% vitamin A, 71.5% vitamin C, 23.5% calcium, 13% iron

Watermelon Protein Cooler

Well hello! I fell of the earth for a bit and finally founnd my way back. Phew! And when I say “fell off the earth,” I really mean I’ve been tackling an enormous pre-baby-#4 to-do list (baby due in 3 weeks). Thankfully, I finally reached item #47: Post something new on BitchinDietitian.com! And here it is. A standby since watermelons have appeared at CostCo, and a creative way to get more watermelons in your life if you’re tackling high blood pressure (new research here).

watermelon smoothie

Watermelon Protein Cooler
Serves 3 (or 1 very thirsty pregnant lady!)

4 cups watermelon chunks (about 430 grams)
12 frozen strawberries (or 12 fresh strawberries, stems removed, plus 1 cup ice)
2 tsp lime juice (fresh is best!)
8 ounces almond milk, hemp milk, or other non-dairy milk
1 scoop protein powder of choice (I like Plant Fusion vanilla)

Blend until smooth. Enjoy!

Each serving has 121 calories, 18 g carbs, and 9 g protein.

See you sooner than later. Cheers! xoxo